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Optometrist At Holly & Derry in Milton, ON

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Home » Your Eye Health » Vision Over 40 » How Progressive Lenses Work

How Progressive Lenses Work

Progressive lenses or progressive addition lenses (PALs) are the most popular multifocal lenses today, offering an effective and great looking vision solution for individuals with presbyopia (age-related near vision loss). The main advantage of progressive lenses over standard bifocals or trifocals is that they don’t have a visible line bisecting the lens, but rather a seamless and gradual change in power as you move down the lens. Rather than two or three distinct zones (for near, far and intermediate), progressive lenses offer a smooth transition of focal powers that covers the total range of clear vision from close to far and every point in between.

As we age, particularly after the age of 40, our near vision begins to deteriorate. Progressive lenses allow you to see at all distances with one pair of glasses. They start with your distance prescription (if you have one) at the top of the lens and increase as you move toward the bottom of the lens. You simply move your head position to allow you to focus through different areas of the lens. Move your head upwards to see something in the distance, hold it straight for intermediate or arm’s length vision and down for near vision for objects that are close up.
In addition to the aesthetic improvement of the lens without the line segments (which tend to make people look and feel older as well), PALs avoid the visual discontinuity or image-jump when your eyes shift from one zone to the other in non-progressive multifocals.

Adapting to Progressive Lenses

While most people adapt to progressive lenses fairly quickly (many immediately), for some, getting comfortable vision with progressive lenses can take a few days. This is normal as you need to train your eyes to look through the appropriate area of the lens and get used to the slight adjustments when you move from one area to another – especially if you move your head quickly. If you find that you are not adapting to the lenses after a few days, speak to your eye doctor- they may not be the right fit or the right option for you.

Types of Progressive Lenses

There are a number of options for progressive lenses which vary in style, price and function.

Standard PALs
Standard progressive lenses must fit to your vision needs. They can be added to frames of your choice, but you need to ensure that the frames are the right width and height proportions to grant enough space for the gradient changes in the lens. Otherwise only a small area will remain for the distance or near vision zones.

Short Corridor PALS
To overcome the issue mentioned above, there are now progressive lenses called “short corridor” lenses made to fit into smaller frames to suit a wider range of eyewear styles.

Computer PALS
Also known as “near variable focus lenses” or “office lenses”, these specialized PALs are designed specifically for computer users and other occupations that require strong intermediate and distance vision. For computer users that work at a computer for many hours, these lenses will help to reduce eye strain, eye fatigue and other symptoms of computer vision syndrome that come from looking at a computer for extended periods.

PALs for reading
Individuals who enjoy reading can opt for a pair of lenses with a larger close vision zone. Free-form lenses offer a customizable surface with a wider area for near vision.

Progressive lenses are a great option for most individuals who require multifocal or reading glasses and still want to maintain a youthful look and appearance. Speak to your eye doctor about your specific needs and lifestyle to find the best option for you.

Dear Patients,

Today, under directions from the College of Optometrists of Ontario, we have made the difficult decision to immediately suspend all non-urgent care,  due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our doctors will still be accessible for ocular emergency assessments case by case. The clinic is closed.

All non-urgent appointments will be canceled and rescheduled for a later date. For urgent care please DO NOT call or come to the clinic, but send an email to: info@miltoneyecare.ca for appropriate triaging.

For patients who need to order contact lenses, please continue to place your order request on our website at www.miltoneyecare.ca. We encourage a 6-12 months’ supply of contact lenses to be ordered.

What consists of an emergency: Ocular Emergencies require an urgent visit within 24-48 hours. Please email our office should you experience:

  1. Chemicals splashed into the eye within the last hour
  2. Sudden loss or decrease in vision, or the appearance of a cloudy veil in front of the eye
  3. Foreign body in the eye, ocular injury or forceful trauma to the eye or surrounding area
  4. Sudden onset of halos around lights; especially if associated with a red painful eye or brow
  5. Sudden onset of flashing lights or floaters
  6. Sudden onset of double vision
  7. Red eyes with pain, light sensitivity or pus discharge
  8. Swelling of eyelid

If you are not sure if you are experiencing an ocular emergency please email our office at info@miltoneyecare.ca

 As this situation evolves, Milton Eye Care is committed to providing updates to our patients. While this is a difficult time for all, we are aspired by our patients who have taken their own personal measures to protect our most vulnerable. Thank you for your understanding. Please stay safe and healthy.

Warmest regards,

Milton Eye Care team